Bring on the Heat, Just Not All At Once

By Fina Scroppo

Access to long sunny days and tropical warmth is a big draw for the Canadian traveller. The key is to know when to say when!

When Scott Chilton went to Costa Rica a couple of months ago, he was looking forward to the tropical climate of the jungle paradise. But two days into his trip, his holiday almost came to an end. He was feeling feverish, drowsy, queasy and his skin was cool to the touch. His body was dehydrated not only from being in scorching temperatures, but also from drinking soft drinks and alcohol and lounging in a hot tub. Scott had heat exhaustion. He spent nearly three days in bed recuperating and wasn’t fully himself for almost a week.

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Sometimes it's the Little Guys Who Get Ya  

By Deborah Sanborn

It’s almost legendary among Eco-Challenge elites—the race of 2000, where so many athletes go sick with leptospirosis  

“They had a river swim in the middle of the race, and of the teams that jumped in, at least one person from each got leptospirosis,” says Lawrence Foster, who helped his Canadian team to a ninth-place finish—only to discover how much it would cost him.

Within days of returning to Canada, he developed symptoms, and by the time he saw a travel health expert, he was seriously ill. “I had to crawl into his office with my head below my knees,” says Foster. So sick was he that the doctor called an ambulance, and Foster spent the next several days in a hospital bed in a semi-conscious state. Turns out, he didn’t only have leptospirosis but also dengue fever—a serious, sometimes fatal disease transmitted by mosquitoes.

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How the Race to the Moon Made Food Safer 

By Deborah Sanborn

Necessity is the mother of invention—not such a cliche when it comes to the history of modern food-safety practices 

It was at the height of the 1960s race to the moon that NASA and the Pillsbury food company devised a plan to make food for space travel as safe as possible. The goal was to prevent food poisoning incidents on missions since, like travellers who’ve spent months planning a dream trip to India, NASA couldn’t afford their moon-bound astronauts getting sick. (Not to mention the inconvenience of getting diarrhea while aboard Apollo 11.)

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Can You Do CPR?

By Deborah Sanborn

The lack of CPR training in the lay population is a big factor in the abysmally low survival rates for out-of-hospital heart attacks

When it actually happened, Robert Brodey could hardly believe it. Sitting in a pizza joint in Queenstown, New Zealand, not a month after taking a CPR course in Canada, a man appeared to be having a heart attack. His first thought, as he saw the man’s head bob down to the table, was that he was vastly unqualified to help. But when it became clear complete chaos was erupting, Brodey flew into action.

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Packing Medication

By Fina Scroppo

Travelling with a boatload of pills for your pre-existing condition? Here's how to do it and not end up behind a set of foreign bars  

From a very young age, Will Pocock, now 29, has dealt with constant ear infections. Despite getting new tubes, his recurring condition saw him in several emergency rooms while travelling with his family. Mom Kate Pocock, a family-travel author, says her son’s susceptibility to infections, as well as rashes, forced her to become better prepared for flare-ups before boarding a plane.

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